Employment

  • February 28, 2024

    Alaska Airlines Says Religion Didn't Factor Into Worker Firings

    Alaska Airlines urged a Washington federal judge to toss two Christian flight attendants' claims that they were pushed out of work due to bias against their religious beliefs by the company and their union, saying they were actually fired because they expressed their beliefs in a discriminatory manner.

  • February 28, 2024

    Pilots Say Airline Shorted Servicemembers' 401(k) Funds

    A discount airline unlawfully failed to contribute to employees' retirement funds when they were on military leave despite repeatedly being told about the oversight by pilots and their union, according to a proposed class action in Minnesota federal court.

  • February 28, 2024

    Ex-Development Director Asks 4th Circ. To Flip Bias Suit Loss

    A former development director for a North Carolina city said she supported her sex discrimination and retaliation claims with evidence that she was treated differently from male colleagues, urging the Fourth Circuit to overturn the city's win in her suit.

  • February 28, 2024

    8th Circ. Axes Federal Mine Agency's Win In Pay Bias Row

    A unanimous Eighth Circuit panel tossed a Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission ruling that a cement company discriminated against a worker by cutting bonuses she was to receive for helping federal inspectors at a mine, saying Wednesday the cut was not motivated by bias.

  • February 28, 2024

    Coats Rose Atty Fired Over Threatening Letter To Judge

    The Texas law firm Coats Rose terminated one of its attorneys believed to have sent intimidating messages on firm letterhead to an immigration judge running for a judgeship in the 151st Civil District Court of Harris County, the firm confirmed to Law360 on Wednesday.

  • February 28, 2024

    Littler Transportation Co-Leader Jumps To Ogletree In SF

    Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC announced Wednesday that the co-leader of Littler Mendelson PC's transportation industry group was joining the firm as a shareholder in its San Francisco office.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Says Ermi Counterclaims In Qui Tam Case Can Stand

    A Georgia federal judge refused on Tuesday to free Ermi LLC's former chief compliance officer from counterclaims the company lodged in response to her whistleblower suit accusing the company of fraud and retaliation, with the judge saying the company has adequately alleged breaches of fiduciary duty and contract claims.

  • February 28, 2024

    TKO Reveals Ongoing Impact Of McMahon Issues In Filing

    WWE is not immune to the personal legal battles and controversies of disgraced founder Vince McMahon, who was recently accused of trafficking a former employee, according to a recent regulatory filing by parent company TKO.

  • February 28, 2024

    11th Circ. Says Late Filing Dooms Black Trucker's Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit refused to reinstate a lawsuit filed by a Black former truck driver for a waste management company who said he was unfairly berated by his supervisor and then fired after 30 years of service, saying he filed his pre-suit discrimination charge too late.

  • February 28, 2024

    NuVasive Can Pierce Co. To Collect From Ex-Rep, Judge Says

    NuVasive Inc. can pierce the corporate veil to collect a $617,000-plus arbitration judgment it won against a company operated by one of its former sales representatives who improperly cut ties with the medical device company and violated his noncompete agreement, a Boston federal judge has ruled. 

  • February 28, 2024

    US Army Escapes Male HR Worker's Gender Bias Suit

    A Kentucky federal judge threw out a civilian human resources employee's lawsuit against the U.S. Army accusing it of holding women to more lax standards than him, saying he failed to rebut his employer's argument that he made a lot of mistakes on the job.

  • February 28, 2024

    Plastic Maker Says Insurers Must Cover Worker Death Suit

    Ohio-based manufacturer Encore Plastics took Travelers Property Casualty Co. of America and American Guarantee & Liability Insurance Co. to federal court, claiming both companies are violating their policies by refusing to defend or indemnify it in an underlying suit over one of its workers' death in an industrial accident.

  • February 28, 2024

    Nurse Wants Staff Co. Wage Suit Paused For 11th Circ. Appeal

    A nurse asked a Georgia federal judge to stay her proposed class action alleging a staffing firm lured nurses to work in Florida using unfulfilled wage promises, pending her appeal of a ruling denying her bid for class certification.

  • February 28, 2024

    Air Force Contractor Strikes Deal In EEOC Disability Bias Suit

    A U.S. Air Force contractor reached a deal to stave off a trial and end a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit alleging the company illegally barred workers from taking certain prescriptions, according to an Alabama federal court filing.

  • February 27, 2024

    Conn. Restaurant Rejects Revamped Wine-Tasting Death Suit

    Citing the statute of limitations and an alleged failure to plead a valid case, a venerable New Haven restaurant has asked a Connecticut state judge to reject an amended lawsuit accusing it of recklessly overserving alcohol at a "mandatory" employee wine tasting event and allegedly causing a worker's drunk driving death.

  • February 27, 2024

    Texas Escapes Pregnant Worker Law But Not Migrant Funding

    A Texas federal judge on Tuesday blocked the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act from taking effect in the state, ruling that the U.S. House trampled on the U.S. Constitution's quorum requirements when it allowed some lawmakers to vote on the legislation by proxy.

  • February 27, 2024

    Wash. Judges Likely To Let Public Defender Keep Workplace Win

    A King County public defender who won a $7 million workplace harassment judgment against her bosses after she was stalked by a client found a receptive appeals panel Tuesday, as the Washington state judges pressed the county to explain how they could unwind a jury's factual findings.

  • February 27, 2024

    Employers Must Battle AI Bias, Fisher Phillips' AI Chief Says

    Employers embracing artificial intelligence and machine learning tools to automate time-consuming tasks, such as screening resumes and conducting interviews, must ensure those tools don't engage in "algorithm drift" that results in improper bias, which could put a company on the hook legally and ruin its brand reputation, says David Walton, chair of Fisher Phillips' artificial intelligence team.

  • February 27, 2024

    Calif. Appeals Court Backs Costco's Race Harassment Win

    A California appeals court declined Tuesday to grant a Black former Costco worker a new trial in his suit alleging he was regularly harassed on the job, ruling he failed to show that a jury was wrong to find that the comments he faced didn't harm him enough to justify a financial award.

  • February 27, 2024

    $11M Meat Co. Deals Get Early OK In Colo. Wage Fixing Suit

    A Colorado federal judge Tuesday gave initial approval to class settlements with two meat producers and a consulting company, requiring $11.25 million in payments to resolve claims that they participated in a nationwide scheme to fix and depress wages for meat plant workers.

  • February 27, 2024

    FTC Puts Labor Focus In Merger Basket For 1st Time

    Higher consumer prices and reduced choice are no longer the only reasons the Federal Trade Commission will challenge mergers after the agency contested Kroger's planned $24.6 billion purchase of Albertsons based in part, for the first time ever, on allegations the deal will reduce competition for employees.

  • February 27, 2024

    Hogan Lovells Says It Was Barred From Labor Dispute Interviews

    A Hogan Lovells attorney for Mexico's San Martín Mine told Law360 that his team has been shut out of proceedings in the first-ever labor-focused panel dispute under the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, centered on alleged collective bargaining violations. 

  • February 27, 2024

    New Lead Confirmed For Watchdog Office For Fed. Employees

    The U.S. Senate voted 49-47 on Tuesday night to confirm Hampton Dellinger, a former Boies Schiller Flexner LLP partner, to lead the federal watchdog agency charged with protecting federal employees' interests.

  • February 27, 2024

    Goldman's $4.6M Exec Compensation Deal OK'd By Chancery

    A Delaware Chancery Court judge on Tuesday approved a settlement deal in a derivative suit against Goldman Sachs Group alleging excessive compensation was paid to nonemployee directors, which includes an agreement by the company to change its compensation practices and reduce executives' pay by an estimated $4.6 million.

  • February 27, 2024

    5th Circ. Sends SpaceX's NLRB Challenge Back To Texas

    A Fifth Circuit panel has ordered a Texas federal judge to pull back a suit from California filed by SpaceX that seeks to declare the National Labor Relations Board unconstitutional, saying it belongs in Texas while the panel mulls its proper venue.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Using Arbitration And Class Waivers As Privacy Suit Tools

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    Amid a surge in data breach class actions over the last few years, several federal court decisions indicate that arbitration clauses and class action waiver provisions can be possible alternatives to public court battles and potentially reduce the costs of privacy litigation, say Mark Olthoff and Courtney Klaus at Polsinelli.

  • Future Not Looking Bright For Calif. Employee Nonsolicits

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    California's new legislation imposing potentially harsh consequences on employers for attempting to enforce noncompetes raises questions about the fate of employee nonsolicitation agreements — and both federal and state court decisions suggest the days of the latter may be numbered, say Anthony Oncidi and Philippe Lebel at Proskauer.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

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    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Best Practices In Light Of NY Anti-Trans Bias Report

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    A recent report from the New York State Department of Labor indicates that bias against transgender and nonbinary people endures in the workplace, highlighting why employers must create supportive policies and gender transition plans, not only to mitigate the risk of discrimination claims, but also to foster an inclusive work culture, says Michelle Phillips at Jackson Lewis.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

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