Wage & Hour

  • May 21, 2024

    Georgia State Farm Office, Ex-Worker Settle Overtime Suit

    A State Farm franchise reached a settlement with a former insurance agent producer, putting to rest claims the company misclassified him as an overtime-exempt salaried worker, failing to pay him overtime wages in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • May 21, 2024

    Construction Groups Press To Halt DOL Prevailing Wage Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final rule regulating prevailing wages under the Davis-Bacon Act creates tangible damage and a Texas federal court should stop it, a group of construction groups suing the department said.

  • May 21, 2024

    4th Circ. Ruling Is Rare Take On FLSA Coverage For Inmates

    A Fourth Circuit decision this month stands out for opening the door to classifying certain incarcerated workers as employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act, representing another shift in the legal discourse around people behind bars, attorneys say.

  • May 21, 2024

    Ex-Workers Drop Gender Bias Suit Against Ga. Medical Cos.

    Two female former human resources workers for a medical management company and a podiatrist center told a Georgia federal court they had agreed to drop their lawsuit accusing their ex-employers of discriminating against them based on gender, reclassifying them as hourly and firing them for complaining.

  • May 21, 2024

    3rd Circ. Revives American Airlines Pilots' Military Leave Suit

    The Third Circuit reopened a class action Tuesday accusing American Airlines of unlawfully denying pilots pay for short military assignments while compensating employees for jury duty and bereavement leave, ruling a trial is needed to determine whether time off for military service is fungible with paid absences.

  • May 21, 2024

    Las Vegas Restaurants Pay $161K For OT Violations

    Three Las Vegas restaurants paid nearly $161,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying 33 workers their overtime pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • May 20, 2024

    FTC Says Albertsons Execs Deleted Texts In Kroger Case

    Kroger and the Federal Trade Commission are at each other's throats over discovery in the agency's in-house challenge to the grocery giant's $25 billion merger with Albertsons and in district court, with the grocers accusing the agency of "running out the clock" and the FTC accusing the grocers of deleting text messages.

  • May 20, 2024

    Zara Strikes $1.25M Deal To Settle Workers' Overtime Suit

    Fast-fashion retailer Zara agreed to a $1.25 million deal to settle accusations that it shortchanged about 500 employees by excluding commissions from overtime calculations, according to a letter filed with a New York federal judge requesting approval of the settlement.

  • May 20, 2024

    Food Co. Workers Tell High Court to Keep 4th Circ. OT Ruling

    Sales workers for an international food distributor urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday not to review a Fourth Circuit ruling holding that they did not qualify for overtime exemption, saying it would be a waste of the high court's time and resources to mull an inconsequential question.

  • May 20, 2024

    Minn. Lawmakers OK Pay Rates For Uber, Lyft Drivers

    The Minnesota Legislature passed a bill setting Uber and Lyft drivers' per-mile and per-minute rates, a move that comes after two years of negotiations during which the ride-hailing giants threatened to partially cease offering their services in the state.

  • May 20, 2024

    Boar's Head Can't Untangle Collective In NY Late Pay Suit

    A New York federal judge said Boar's Head can't get reconsideration of an order greenlighting a collective in a late pay suit because the workers in the case supported their claims, but granted the deli meat and cheese company's request to rework the collective definition.

  • May 20, 2024

    Wyndham Wants Out Of Pa. Hotel's Labor Trafficking Case

    Wyndham Hotels & Resorts argued to a federal court Monday it could not be plausibly alleged the chain knew or could have known that its former franchisee at a New Stanton, Pennsylvania, Days Inn was exploiting laborers in a room-for-hire scheme, and so it should be dismissed from the laborers' lawsuit.

  • May 20, 2024

    Agricultural Groups Agree To Toss Claim In H-2A Rule Dispute

    Several Florida-based agricultural groups agreed to toss a claim in their suit challenging the U.S. Department of Labor's rule raising the wages of H-2A agricultural workers, saying while they still believe the allegation is viable, trimming the suit will expedite the litigation.

  • May 20, 2024

    Wash. Pay Range Suits Meet Early Crossroads On Standing

    A federal court's ruling that a job applicant lacked standing to claim an employer violated Washington state's new requirement for employers to include pay ranges in job ads may signal that workers will fare better advancing such claims in state court, attorneys told Law360.

  • May 20, 2024

    United Healthcare Skimped On OT, NM Nurse Says

    United Healthcare misclassified New Mexico-based case manager registered nurses as overtime-exempt even though they have overtime-eligible responsibilities, cheating them out of overtime wages when they work over 40 hours in a week, an ex-nurse said in a complaint in federal court.

  • May 20, 2024

    Rocket Mortgage Agrees To Pay $3.5M To End OT Suit

    Rocket Mortgage agreed to pay out $3.5 million to end a collective suit in Arizona federal court accusing it of failing to pay mortgage brokers for the after-hours work they performed.

  • May 17, 2024

    Trucking Co. Dodges Misclassification Suit, For Now

    A trucking company can temporarily escape claims that it misclassified drivers as independent contractors because the driver lodging the suit failed to show jurisdictional diversity, an Illinois federal judge ruled.

  • May 17, 2024

    Manager Says Travel Co. Fired Her For Promotion Complaints

    A corporate hotel booking service gave lackluster performance reviews to a female national sales manager because she had taken maternity leave and fired her after she raised concerns about being passed over for promotions in favor of a less experienced male co-worker, according to a lawsuit in Colorado federal court.

  • May 17, 2024

    Justices' Arbitration Ruling To Slow Wage Appeals

    Workers will struggle to appeal orders compelling arbitration now that the U.S. Supreme Court has said federal courts must stay cases when claims are sent to arbitration instead of dismissing them, attorneys said. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • May 17, 2024

    DOL Fails To Win Order Barring Retaliation On Pork Workers

    A Tennessee federal judge rebuffed a request from the U.S. Department of Labor to bar a pork producer from retaliating against workers providing information about wages, ruling that the department had failed to show that any retaliation had occurred.

  • May 17, 2024

    Industry Emboldened After Justices Galvanize Agency Attacks

    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court said "extraordinary" and "far-reaching" attacks on administrative enforcers can skip agency tribunals and go straight to federal district court, ambitious challenges to regulatory powers are rapidly gaining traction, and the high court is poised to put them on an even firmer footing.

  • May 17, 2024

    Chicago Tribune Accused Of Underpaying Female, Black Staff

    A group of Chicago Tribune journalists sued the paper and its parent Alden Global Capital in Illinois federal court on Thursday alleging sex and race discrimination that has caused more than 50 reporters and editors to get paid thousands of dollars per year less than their white male colleagues.

  • May 17, 2024

    Delivery Apps Illegally Adding Extra Fees In Seattle, FTC Told

    DoorDash and Uber illegally charge "deceptive and unfair" junk fees to customers to cover the companies' costs to comply with a Seattle law mandating minimum wages for app-based workers, a consumer told the Federal Trade Commission in a complaint.

  • May 17, 2024

    NY Forecast: Doctor's Disability Bias Case Goes To 2nd Circ.

    In the coming week, the Second Circuit will hear a former New York University hospital doctor's bid to revive his suit claiming the hospital discriminated against him on the basis of his disability by denying him work accommodations before firing him. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 17, 2024

    DOL Wants Early Win In Support Co. Misclassification Suit

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged a Florida federal judge to grant it a pretrial win in its suit accusing a customer support services provider of misclassifying 22,000 workers as independent contractors, saying it's clear the company has near-total control over their work.

Expert Analysis

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

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    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Investigation Lessons In 'Minority Report'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper discuss how themes in Steven Spielberg's Science Fiction masterpiece "Minority Report" — including prediction, prevention and the fallibility of systems — can have real-life implications in workplace investigations.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

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    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

  • 9 Tools To Manage PAGA Claims After Calif. High Court Ruling

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    In Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills, the California Supreme Court recently dealt a blow to employers by ruling that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, but defendants and courts can still use arbitration agreements, due process challenges and other methods when dealing with unmanageable claims, says Ryan Krueger at Sheppard Mullin.