Wage & Hour

  • May 09, 2024

    Charter, Workers Both Want Quick Win In Vacation Time Suit

    Workers alleging that Charter Communications failed to pay out unused vacation time when it merged with Time Warner Cable asked a California federal judge to grant them a win, saying state wage law unambiguously requires the payouts, while Charter urged the court to find the opposite.

  • May 09, 2024

    Bronx Urgent Care, DOL Reach $160K Deal In Wage Suit

    An urgent care in the Bronx will pay $160,000 in back wages, damages and fines to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit accusing it of stiffing workers on overtime pay, according to court papers.

  • May 08, 2024

    Lyft Driver Asks Calif. Justices To OK Intervening In PAGA Suit

    An attorney for a Lyft driver who sued the company under the Private Attorneys General Act urged the California Supreme Court on Wednesday to find her client has standing to intervene in a competing PAGA Lyft case that reached a settlement, saying the deal threatened to "extinguish" her client's rights.

  • May 08, 2024

    4th Circ. Says Purpose Of Inmate Labor Affects Classification

    The primary purpose of prisoners' work at a Baltimore County recycling plant should determine whether a group of incarcerated people were employees under federal law, a Fourth Circuit panel ruled Wednesday, rejecting the county's view that any amount of rehabilitative-oriented work spared it from minimum wage obligations.

  • May 08, 2024

    Arbitration Pact Doesn't Bar PAGA Penalty Claims, Panel Says

    An arbitration agreement a worker signed with a gardening retailer doesn't apply to his representative civil penalty claims under California's Private Attorneys General Act, a state appellate panel held, saying the language of the agreement shows the parties didn't intend to arbitrate those kinds of disputes.

  • May 08, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Farmworkers Union Says DOL's 2022 Rules Keep Wages Low

    A farmworkers union in Washington state is challenging rules the U.S. Department of Labor introduced in 2022 that the union said are depressing farmworkers' wages.

  • May 08, 2024

    Oil Field Workers File Proposed Class Suit Over Unpaid Wages

    Three oil field workers have slapped their employers with a proposed collective and class action in Texas federal court accusing the companies of failing to pay overtime and straight-time wages to hourly, day rate and salaried workers in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • May 08, 2024

    Pizzeria Must Face Ex-Driver's Wage Kickback Claims

    A pizza eatery can't escape a former delivery driver's suit claiming unreimbursed expenses pushed his wages below the federal minimum rate, with a Georgia federal judge ruling Wednesday the ex-worker doesn't need to specify the on-the-job costs he alleged he unfairly shouldered.

  • May 08, 2024

    Littler Atty Named Miami Leader Less Than 1 Year After Arrival

    Littler Mendelson PC has selected one of its newest shareholders in Miami to take over the office managing shareholder position, the firm announced Wednesday.

  • May 08, 2024

    Mass. Justices May Give Green Light To Tip Ballot Measure

    Massachusetts' high court justices appeared skeptical Wednesday of arguments by a group of restaurant owners seeking to kill a ballot question that, if approved, would gradually raise the minimum wage for tipped workers to the state's $15-per-hour standard.

  • May 08, 2024

    An Untested Clause Could Fortify DOL's Overtime Rule

    A novel clause in the U.S. Department of Labor's rule expanding workers' overtime protection could help it hold up if critics challenge it in court, experts told Law360.

  • May 08, 2024

    Calif. Sewing Contractors To Pay $200K To End DOL Suit

    Two sewing contractors in Los Angeles will pay $200,000 to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging they denied workers full wages and shipped goods produced in violation of federal wage law across state lines, according to court papers.

  • May 08, 2024

    Medical Manufacturing Co., Welder Settle OT Suit

    A former welder told an Ohio federal court he reached a deal with the medical and dental product manufacturing company he accused of not paying for the work he performed before his scheduled shifts.

  • May 08, 2024

    Tenn. Hairstylists To Settle Independent Contractor Claims

    A hair salon and a group of hairstylists asked a Tennessee federal judge to sign off on a settlement ending their claims seeking to recover minimum and overtime wages, saying they reached a reasonable compromise during arbitration.

  • May 07, 2024

    Gov't Enforcement Concerns Employers, Littler Report Finds

    Almost three-quarters of U.S. employers share great concern over the impact the U.S. Department of Labor's and the National Labor Relations Board's enforcement actions will have on their businesses, according to a survey Littler Mendelson PC released Wednesday.

  • May 07, 2024

    NYC Eatery Asks 2nd Circ. To Undo Revival Of Workers' Suit

    A New York City restaurant operator urged the Second Circuit Tuesday to reject a lower court finding that its workers' federal wage claims may be cut from their class action but can also be reinstated if the appeals court were to vacate their state wage claims, insisting the decision is unfair.

  • May 07, 2024

    DOJ Tells High Court To Undo 4th Circ. OT Carveout Ruling

    Employers need only adhere to a less stringent standard in proving whether a worker is overtime-exempt, the U.S. Department of Justice told the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday in support of the reversal of a Fourth Circuit ruling that sales workers didn't fit the carveout's guidelines.

  • May 07, 2024

    NJ Justices Say Survivor Gag Orders Flout #MeToo Law

    A nondisparagement clause in a former New Jersey police sergeant's settlement agreement resolving sex discrimination, sexual harassment and retaliation claims against her former employer is against public policy and unenforceable, the New Jersey Supreme Court held on Tuesday.

  • May 07, 2024

    Wash. Opinion Establishes Pay Transparency Suit Battle Lines

    A Washington federal court opinion on a job applicant's pay transparency suit offers clues to how this novel area of equal pay could play out in future litigation, attorneys say, and it raises questions on what constitutes harm and a sincere application effort.

  • May 07, 2024

    Ark. Restaurant Operator Pays $12K For FMLA Infractions

    The operator of nine restaurants in Arkansas paid nearly $12,000 in back wages and fines for firing a worker who took protected leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday.

  • May 07, 2024

    Excavator Can't Bury DOL Back Pay Retaliation Suit

    A Vermont excavation company can't escape the U.S. Department of Labor's suit alleging it retaliated against the worker who initiated an agency investigation, with a federal judge ruling Tuesday that a threatening Facebook post was meant to intimidate the ex-worker and cannot be protected as free speech.

  • May 07, 2024

    Ogletree Adds Shareholder In Detroit From Miller Canfield

    Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC has added a labor and employment partner from Michigan firm Miller Canfield Paddock & Stone PLC to its Detroit office, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • May 07, 2024

    Calif. Panel Says Court Could Undo Order Disqualifying Attys

    A California trial court correctly reconsidered its earlier ruling on a truck body manufacturer's bid to disqualify a workers' side firm from a wage and hour suit, a state appellate panel said, ruling that a temporary missing document led the court in the wrong direction.

  • May 07, 2024

    Amazon Worker Wants Class Cert. In Military Leave Suit

    A former Amazon worker urged a New York federal court to greenlight a more than 9,000-member class of military reservists in her lawsuit accusing the e-commerce giant of failing to provide paid leave for employees on active duty, saying the dispute is best suited for class treatment.

  • May 07, 2024

    Janitorial Contractor Pays $649K To Settle Child Labor Suit

    A Tennessee janitorial contractor will pay more than $649,000 in fines to settle a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it permitted children to work dangerous jobs overnight, according to court documents.

Expert Analysis

  • Employer Best Practices For Pay Transparency Compliance

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    With conflicting pay transparency and disclosure laws appearing across the country, employers must carefully develop different strategies for discussing compensation with employees, applicants, and off-site workers, disclosing salaries in job ads, and staying abreast of new state and local compliance requirements, says Joy Rosenquist at Littler Mendelson.

  • Calif. Cos. May Have To Reimburse More Remote Work Costs

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    After a California appeals court's recent decision in Thai v. IBM, countless California employers will be required to pay work-related costs incurred by their employees who were sent home during the pandemic, and this could be just the beginning of a reckoning, say Sonya Goodwin at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Water Cooler Talk: 'The Bear' Serves Up Advice For Managers

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Ernst & Young’s Laura Yehuda about Hulu's "The Bear" and the best practices managers can glean from the show's portrayal of workplace challenges, including those faced by young, female managers.

  • Calif. Employers Note: Industrial Welfare Commission Is Back

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    An appropriations bill recently passed in California instructs the Industrial Welfare Commission to reconvene for the first time in 19 years, opening a door for the regulatory body to significantly affect employer operations by strengthening standards for meal and rest breaks, scheduling, record-keeping, and more, say Denisha McKenzie and John Keeney at CDF Labor Law.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Colorado Antitrust Reform Carries Broad State Impact

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    Colorado recently became the latest state to update and expand its antitrust laws, and the new act may significantly affect enforcement and private litigation, particularly when it comes to workers and consumers, says Diane Hazel at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Tips For Fighting Back Against Explosive Verdicts

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    Massive jury verdicts are a product of our time, driven in part by reptile tactics, but employers can build a strategic defense to mitigate the risk of a runaway jury, and develop tools to seek judicial relief in the event of an adverse outcome, say Dawn Solowey and Lynn Kappelman at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Not A Total Loss For Employer Arbitration

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    Contrary to the conclusion reached in a recent Law360 guest article, the California Supreme Court’s ruling in Adolph v. Uber Technologies did not diminish the benefit of arbitrating employees’ individual Private Attorneys General Act claims, as the very limited ruling does not undermine U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Steven Katz at Constangy.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Changing Status Quo In A Union Shop

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    A recent administrative law decision concerning a dispute between Fortune Media and the NewsGuild of New York is an important reminder to employers with unionized workforces to refrain from making unilateral updates to employee handbooks that will change the terms and conditions of employment, says Jennifer Hataway at Butler Snow.

  • Eye On Compliance: A Shift In Religious Accommodation Law

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    The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Groff v. DeJoy is making it more difficult for employers to deny religious accommodations, and there are three takeaways employers should keep in mind, say William Cook and Matthew High at Wilson Elser.

  • FLSA Collective Actions: Are Courts Still Dancing The 2-Step?

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    In the absence of amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, courts have filled in some of the statute's gaps and established a two-step framework for conditional certification of a class, but recent rulings show signs that courts are ready to hold party plaintiffs to a higher standard if they want to recruit others to join their lawsuits, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Devalues Arbitration For Employers

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent opinion in Adolph v. Uber may lessen employers' appetites for arbitration under the state’s Private Attorneys General Act, because arbitrating an allegedly aggrieved employee’s individual claims is unlikely to dispose of their nonindividual claims, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Understanding Illinois' Temp Worker Obligation Updates

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    Recent amendments to the Illinois Day and Temporary Labor Services Act would significantly expand the protection for temporary workers in the state, impose new compliance obligations on staffing agencies and their client companies, and add significant enforcement teeth to the act, say Nicholas Anaclerio and Ellie Hemminger at Vedder Price.