Georgia

  • February 28, 2024

    Subcontractor Seeks Sanctions In Amazon Warehouse Fight

    An electric subcontractor locked in a dispute with a construction company over delayed building of an Amazon warehouse in southern Georgia asked a Peach State federal court to penalize its opponent for "blatant discovery abuses" in the case.

  • February 28, 2024

    Pair Can't Sue Over Crash Caused By Chase, Ga. Court Says

    The Georgia Court of Appeals on Tuesday affirmed the dismissal of a lawsuit brought against the state's Department of Public Safety by a married couple who alleged a state trooper's reckless disregard for safety during a high-speed pursuit resulted in a crash that injured the husband.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Says Ermi Counterclaims In Qui Tam Case Can Stand

    A Georgia federal judge refused on Tuesday to free Ermi LLC's former chief compliance officer from counterclaims the company lodged in response to her whistleblower suit accusing the company of fraud and retaliation, with the judge saying the company has adequately alleged breaches of fiduciary duty and contract claims.

  • February 28, 2024

    11th Circ. Says Late Filing Dooms Black Trucker's Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit refused to reinstate a lawsuit filed by a Black former truck driver for a waste management company who said he was unfairly berated by his supervisor and then fired after 30 years of service, saying he filed his pre-suit discrimination charge too late.

  • February 28, 2024

    Full 11th Circ. Won't Rethink Meadows' Failed Removal Bid

    The Eleventh Circuit declined Wednesday to give former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows another shot at removing his Georgia election interference prosecution to federal court, rejecting Meadows' bid for an en banc review of his unsuccessful appeal.

  • February 28, 2024

    Trump's Co-Defendants Barred From Seeing Classified Docs

    The Florida federal judge overseeing former President Donald Trump's criminal case over allegedly mishandling secret documents after leaving office ruled that Trump's two co-defendants can't review roughly 5,100 pages of classified material marked as evidence, saying it's not "relevant and helpful" to their defense.

  • February 28, 2024

    Trump Can't Freeze $465M Penalty But Can Seek Loans

    A New York state appellate judge on Wednesday refused to freeze the $465 million civil fraud judgment against Donald Trump while he appeals the award, but said the former president could take out loans to cover the cost of the judgment.  

  • February 28, 2024

    Court Should Block IRS 'Fishing Expedition,' Company Says

    A company that claims it has been the victim of an IRS "fishing expedition" after being hit with a raft of document requests urged a Georgia federal judge Tuesday to keep alive its bid to quash the summonses, telling the court the government overstepped its bounds in seeking "a wide variety of duplicative, irrelevant, and unrelated information."

  • February 28, 2024

    Nurse Wants Staff Co. Wage Suit Paused For 11th Circ. Appeal

    A nurse asked a Georgia federal judge to stay her proposed class action alleging a staffing firm lured nurses to work in Florida using unfulfilled wage promises, pending her appeal of a ruling denying her bid for class certification.

  • February 28, 2024

    Barnes & Thornburg Securities Ace Rejoins Kilpatrick In Ga.

    Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP has strengthened its mergers and acquisitions and securities team with an attorney in Atlanta who returned to the firm after a couple of years practicing with Barnes & Thornburg LLP.

  • February 27, 2024

    'I Don't Know' When Ga. DA Romance Began, Witness Says

    The former law partner of Fulton County special prosecutor Nathan Wade, who oversees the election interference case against former President Donald Trump and his Georgia co-defendants, testified Tuesday that he didn't know when Wade's romantic relationship with District Attorney Fani T. Willis began.

  • February 27, 2024

    Monsanto Wants Further 11th Circ. Roundup Suit Review

    Monsanto has for a second time pressed the full Eleventh Circuit to review a panel ruling that a Georgia doctor's allegations the company failed to warn about cancer risks of using the Roundup weed killer was permitted despite federal pesticide labeling requirements.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ga. ICE Facility Dismissed From Forced Labor Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Tuesday allowed an immigration detention facility to escape a proposed class action accusing it of forcing detainees to work for as little as $1 per day after it argued it couldn't be sued under Georgia law.

  • February 27, 2024

    11th Circ. Throws Shade On $40M Sunglasses Repair Deal

    The Eleventh Circuit has eliminated a $40 million settlement of class allegations that the Costa Del Mar sunglasses company deceived customers about its lifetime warranty, siding with objectors who said an inflated value of consumer vouchers in the deal prompted unreasonably large attorney fees.

  • February 27, 2024

    OpenAI 'Fails to Explain' Away Fee Bid, 11th Circ. Told

    A Georgia radio host is continuing to press his case that OpenAI owes him legal fees for its abortive bid to remove his defamation suit against the company to federal court, telling the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday that there's ample grounds to send the case back to the district court level for the explanation he's owed.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ousted Fla. Atty Eyeing Potential Run After 11th Circ. Ruling

    Suspended state prosecutor Andrew Warren said Monday he may revisit his decision not to seek reelection in light of the Eleventh Circuit ruling reviving his lawsuit against Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, asking the appeals court to speed up the appeal.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ga. Judge Pauses $300M Bond Deadline In Monkey Farm Fight

    A Georgia federal judge on Monday suspended an imminent deadline for a $300 million bond agreement to finance the construction of a controversial primate-rearing farm amid a series of court fights over whether local officials can legally back out of the deal.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ex-DOJ Atty Won't Have To Show Docs Tied To Election Letter

    The D.C. bar disciplinary counsel pursuing ethics charges against former U.S. Department of Justice attorney Jeffrey Clark cannot force him to turn over documents regarding a draft letter that purported to identify "significant concerns" with the 2020 presidential election, a D.C. appeals court ruled.

  • February 27, 2024

    Defective Golf Net Bought At Dick's Harmed Eye, Suit Says

    A man who suffered long-term eye damage from a ricocheting golf ball he launched into an allegedly defective golf net he purchased at Dick's Sporting Goods Inc. has filed suit against the company in Georgia federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    11th Circ. Says Bankruptcy Fraud Threat Can't Tank Deal

    The Eleventh Circuit ruled Monday that coupon marketing agency Valpak's alleged threat to report a franchisee for bankruptcy fraud was not extortion and refused to set aside the settlement that ended the franchisee's suit accusing Valpak of wrongfully terminating their agreement.

  • February 26, 2024

    Medical Device Companies Settle Ga. Wrongful Death Suit

    Two medical alert device companies have settled a Georgia man's allegations that their negligent handling of his mother's distress call led to her death, avoiding a looming trial in the case, according to a filing Monday in Peach State federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Ga. Appeals Court Brings Care Co. Back Into Death Suit

    A Georgia Court of Appeals panel on Monday reversed a trial court's decision to release a disability service coordination company from a wrongful death lawsuit, finding that it remains an open question as to whether the company's negligence cost one of its patients her life.

  • February 26, 2024

    Brother Of Suspect In University Slaying Charged With Fraud

    The brother of the suspect charged in the slaying of a nursing student on the University of Georgia's Athens campus was charged Friday night with possessing a fraudulent green card and is now in state custody.

  • February 26, 2024

    GOP States, Groups Back Texas In Rio Grande Barrier Fight

    Republican-led states and conservative groups have filed briefs supporting Texas in its legal fight with the Biden administration over the 1,000-foot anti-migrant barrier in the Rio Grande, echoing the Lone Star State's argument that it has a constitutional right to defend itself from an "invasion" of migrants from Mexico.

  • February 26, 2024

    Manhattan DA Seeks Trump Gag Order For Hush Money Trial

    The Manhattan District Attorney's Office has asked a New York state judge to limit what Donald Trump can say publicly about the upcoming hush money trial against him, referencing Trump's history of intimidating and harassing witnesses, jurors, attorneys and court staff.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Justices' Double Jeopardy Ruling Preserves Acquittal Sanctity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision last week in McElrath v. Georgia, barring the state from retrying a man acquitted of murder after a so-called repugnant verdict, is significant in the tangled web of double jeopardy jurisprudence for its brief and unequivocal protection of an acquittal’s finality, says Lissa Griffin at Pace Law School.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

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