Trials

  • June 07, 2024

    Minn. Jury Convicts 5 In Food Aid Fraud Trial Marred By Bribe

    A Minnesota federal jury on Friday convicted five out of seven defendants on a litany of charges alleging they schemed to defraud a federal food aid program during the COVID-19 pandemic, days after one juror told of being offered a $120,000 bribe to vote for acquittal.

  • June 07, 2024

    Off The Bench: NFL On Trial, Betting Crackdowns, Tennis Suit

    In this week's Off The Bench, the NFL stands trial in a massive antitrust class action over its Sunday Ticket broadcast package, a series of sports betting crackdowns makes waves in the MLB and the NBA, and the U.S. Tennis Association denies any liability for a player's sexual assault by her coach.

  • June 07, 2024

    Purdue Keeps $32.5M Semiconductor Patent Trial Win

    U.S. District Judge Alan Albright entered final judgment Thursday affirming a Texas federal jury's finding that microchip maker STMicroelectronics owes the trustees of Purdue University $32.5 million for infringing a semiconductor patent, rejecting the chipmaker's argument that Purdue engaged in inequitable conduct by allegedly hiding prior art.

  • June 07, 2024

    Mich. Atty Convicted Of Client's Murder Gets License Pulled

    The Michigan Attorney Discipline Board has suspended the license of a lawyer recently convicted of plotting to kill two of his clients, a jeweler and his wife, and of killing the jeweler, allegedly to gain access to their trust.

  • June 07, 2024

    Ex-Insurance Broker Tells Jury He Bribed Sen. Menendez

    A former insurance broker testified Friday that he bribed U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez to intervene in an investigation by the New Jersey attorney general's office in return for a Mercedes-Benz convertible, which replaced a car that was totaled in a fatal crash involving the congressman's wife.

  • June 07, 2024

    Carhartt Heir's Atty Cleared On 2 Counts; Deadlock On Rest

    A Michigan state jury in Detroit on Friday partially cleared a Michigan attorney accused of stealing millions of dollars from his wealthy client, the late Carhartt company heiress Gretchen Valade, but jurors could not agree on two of four charges.

  • June 07, 2024

    Former Allianz Unit Exec Admits Role In $6B Fund Fraud

    A former portfolio manager at Allianz SE's U.S. unit told a Manhattan federal judge Friday that he lied to investors about the risks of the German finance giant's now-defunct Structured Alpha Funds, admitting to his role in a $6 billion fraud.

  • June 07, 2024

    Google Ad Tech Case Won't Go To Jury Due To Co.'s Payment

    A Virginia federal judge ruled Friday that the U.S. Department of Justice's case accusing Google of monopolizing key digital advertising technology will be heard by the bench, and not a jury, thanks to a $2.3 million check from Google covering the amount enforcers could be awarded if they prevail.

  • June 06, 2024

    Health Co. CEO Sold Stock Amid Souring Cigna Deal, Jury Told

    A stock analyst told California federal jurors Thursday he noticed in disclosure forms that the founder of healthcare company Ontrak Inc. was starting to sell company shares a few weeks before Cigna announced it was terminating its $90 million contract with the company.

  • June 06, 2024

    NFL Sunday Ticket Is A Rigged Game, Antitrust Jury Told

    An attorney for NFL Sunday Ticket subscribers told a California jury Thursday during opening statements of a multibillion-dollar antitrust suit that secret documents will prove the NFL engaged in anticompetitive behavior, and the trial would reveal the "darker side of the NFL behind the shield."

  • June 06, 2024

    Real Water Caused 'Devastating' Hospitalizations, Jury Told

    A mother whose twin babies were hospitalized with acute liver failure after the family subscribed to water delivery service Real Water told a Nevada state jury Thursday that the experience was "devastating."

  • June 06, 2024

    Hallie Biden Tells Jury She 'Panicked' Finding Hunter's Gun

    Hunter Biden's former sister-in-law and ex-girlfriend told a Delaware federal jury Thursday that she "panicked" when she found a gun and a box of bullets in his truck and threw the gun in a grocery store trash can because she was afraid he might hurt himself.

  • June 06, 2024

    Harvey Weinstein Bill Won't Become NY Law This Year

    A New York state bill that would have made evidence of past sexual offenses explicitly admissible in sex crime trials — inspired by Harvey Weinstein's recent rape conviction reversal — has fizzled out in the state Assembly following its quick passage in the state Senate, New York legislators told Law360 Thursday.

  • June 06, 2024

    NRA Can't Undo $6.4M Misconduct Verdict In NY AG Case

    A New York judge on Thursday rejected a request by the National Rifle Association and its longtime executives to set aside a jury's $6.4 million verdict that found they misspent charitable funds, saying Attorney General Letitia James provided sufficient evidence for the jurors to rule in her favor.

  • June 06, 2024

    Victims Say Chiquita Paramilitary Payments Weren't Extortion

    Attorneys for the families of people killed by right-wing paramilitaries in Colombia's banana-producing region asked jurors Thursday for an amount totaling tens of millions of dollars in damages as they closed out their Florida federal case against Chiquita, arguing the company willingly funded paramilitary groups.

  • June 06, 2024

    Judge OKs $42M Stent IP Verdict, Discards Willfulness Finding

    A Delaware federal judge has said Boston Scientific was not entitled to a new trial in a case where it was told to pay $42 million for stent systems patent infringement, but threw out a finding of willful infringement.

  • June 06, 2024

    Kwok's 'Whole Movement Is A Scam,' Ex-Fundraiser Tells Jury

    A former top deputy in exiled Chinese billionaire Ho Wan Kwok's anti-Chinese Communist Party movement testified in Manhattan federal court this week that she raised millions of investor dollars out of a deep belief in the cause, but has since realized the entire enterprise was a "scam."

  • June 06, 2024

    Psychiatrist Gets 99 Months For $19M Billing Fraud Scheme

    A psychiatrist who was convicted for a $19 million insurance fraud scheme was sentenced Thursday to 99 months in prison by a Boston federal judge, who found that there was "overwhelming evidence" of the doctor's guilt.

  • June 06, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy CEO, VP Both Cleared In HP Criminal Fraud Trial

    A California federal jury on Thursday acquitted former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch and former finance Vice President Stephen Chamberlain of criminal fraud and conspiracy charges following an 11-week trial over allegations that the two conned HP into overpaying billions for the British tech company.

  • June 06, 2024

    Former New Jersey AG Recalls 'Gross' Meeting With Menendez

    A U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission official took the stand in the bribery trial of Sen. Robert Menendez on Thursday, testifying that he shut down "gross" inquiries by the congressman while the official was serving as New Jersey's attorney general.

  • June 06, 2024

    Bannon Ordered To Start Prison Term By July 1

    Donald Trump ally Steve Bannon was ordered Thursday in D.C. federal court to surrender and begin his four-month prison sentence for defying a congressional subpoena by July 1, after losing his appeal in the D.C. Circuit.

  • June 06, 2024

    Feds Copied Privileged Doc In OneTaste Charges, Execs Say

    Two executives of sexual wellness company OneTaste have renewed their bid to throw out the indictment against them on forced-labor conspiracy charges, claiming prosecutors used a privileged document to tailor the charges.

  • June 05, 2024

    Nissan Driver's Injuries Came From Head Strike, Surgeon Says

    A Nevada neurosurgeon told a jury Wednesday that the neck injuries he saw on a Nissan driver whose airbags allegedly misdeployed were "objectively" caused by a strong force against the forehead, despite a radiologist's differing opinion.

  • June 05, 2024

    Bank Shareholders Say Venezuelan Takeover Cost Them $27M

    Shareholders in a small Miami bank told jurors Wednesday that board members working for the Venezuelan government had taken control of the bank and cost shareholders $27 million by engaging with the sanctioned Venezuelan government.

  • June 05, 2024

    Massive NFL Sunday Ticket Antitrust Trial Kicks Off In LA

    The California federal trial in a multibillion-dollar antitrust suit against the NFL by Sunday Ticket subscribers kicked off Wednesday with the seating of eight jurors and two alternates, after some potential jurors were eliminated for expressing strong views on former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, player concussions and the league's significant wealth.

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    Justices' Forfeiture Ruling Resolves Nonexistent Split

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in McIntosh v. U.S., holding that a trial court’s failure to enter a preliminary criminal forfeiture order prior to sentencing doesn’t bar its entry later, is unusual in that it settles an issue on which the lower courts were not divided — but it may apply in certain forfeiture disputes, says Stefan Cassella at Asset Forfeiture Law.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Circumstantial Evidence Requires A Pointillist Approach

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    Because complex cases with sophisticated defendants are unlikely to reveal much, if any, direct evidence, attorneys must aggregate many pieces of circumstantial evidence into a cohesive narrative — much like the painting technique of pointillism, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Questions Persist After Ruling Skirts $925M TCPA Award Issue

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    After an Oregon federal court's recent Wakefield v. ViSalus ruling that the doctrine of constitutional avoidance precluded it from deciding whether a $925 million Telephone Consumer Protection Act damages award was constitutionally sound, further guidance is needed on when statutory damages violate due process, says Michael Klotz at O'Melveny.

  • Discord Stock Case Toss Means Little For Fraud Defendants

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    A Texas federal court’s recent dismissal of fraud charges related to a "pump and dump" scheme on Discord is an outlier after the U.S. Supreme Court scrapped the right-to-control theory of fraud last year, and ultimately won't deter the government from pursuing routine securities prosecutions, says William Johnston at Bird Marella.

  • Weisselberg's Perjury At Trial Spotlights Atty Ethics Issues

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    Former Trump Organization executive Allen Weisselberg’s recent guilty plea for perjury in the New York attorney general's civil fraud trial should serve as a reminder to attorneys of their ethical duties when they know a client has lied or plans to lie in court, and the potential penalties for not fulfilling those obligations, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Texas Hair Bias Ruling Does Not Give Employers A Pass

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    A Texas state court’s recent decision, holding that a school could discipline a student with locs for refusing to cut his hair, should not be interpreted by employers as a license to implement potentially discriminatory grooming policies, says Dawn Holiday at Jackson Walker.

  • The Merger Cases That Will Matter At ABA Antitrust Meeting

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    While the American Bar Association's Antitrust Spring Meeting this week will cover all types of competition law issues in the U.S. and abroad, expect the federal agencies' recent track record in merger enforcement to be a key area of focus on the official panels and in cocktail party chatter, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Calif. Verdict Showcases SEC's New 'Shadow Trading' Theory

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    Last week's insider trading verdict, delivered against biopharmaceutical executive Matthew Panuwat by a California federal jury, signals open season on a new area of regulatory enforcement enabled by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's shadow trading theory, say Perrie Weiner and Aaron Goodman at Baker McKenzie.

  • Strategies For Defense Attys To Subpoena A Nonparty Witness

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    Federal criminal defendants seeking to subpoena potentially exculpatory information from nonparty witnesses must satisfy a stringent standard and should consider several often overlooked arguments to assure courts they’re not engaging in a fishing expedition, says James Roberts at Schlam Stone.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • High Court's Jan. 6 Rioter Case May Have Wide Ripple Effects

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    The U.S. Supreme Court will soon hear oral arguments in Fischer v. United States, a case that will determine whether a law enacted after the Enron scandal can be used to prosecute Jan. 6 rioters, and could affect the government’s ability to charge those who impede a range of official proceedings, say Brook Dooley and Sara Fitzpatrick at Keker Van Nest.

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