Trials

  • June 06, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy CEO, VP Both Cleared In HP Criminal Fraud Trial

    A California federal jury on Thursday acquitted former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch and former finance Vice President Stephen Chamberlain of criminal fraud and conspiracy charges following an 11-week trial over allegations that the two conned HP into overpaying billions for the British tech company.

  • June 06, 2024

    Former New Jersey AG Recalls 'Gross' Meeting With Menendez

    A U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission official took the stand in the bribery trial of Sen. Robert Menendez on Thursday, testifying that he shut down "gross" inquiries by the congressman while the official was serving as New Jersey's attorney general.

  • June 06, 2024

    Bannon Ordered To Start Prison Term By July 1

    Donald Trump ally Steve Bannon was ordered Thursday in D.C. federal court to surrender and begin his four-month prison sentence for defying a congressional subpoena by July 1, after losing his appeal in the D.C. Circuit.

  • June 06, 2024

    Feds Copied Privileged Doc In OneTaste Charges, Execs Say

    Two executives of sexual wellness company OneTaste have renewed their bid to throw out the indictment against them on forced-labor conspiracy charges, claiming prosecutors used a privileged document to tailor the charges.

  • June 05, 2024

    Nissan Driver's Injuries Came From Head Strike, Surgeon Says

    A Nevada neurosurgeon told a jury Wednesday that the neck injuries he saw on a Nissan driver whose airbags allegedly misdeployed were "objectively" caused by a strong force against the forehead, despite a radiologist's differing opinion.

  • June 05, 2024

    Bank Shareholders Say Venezuelan Takeover Cost Them $27M

    Shareholders in a small Miami bank told jurors Wednesday that board members working for the Venezuelan government had taken control of the bank and cost shareholders $27 million by engaging with the sanctioned Venezuelan government.

  • June 05, 2024

    Massive NFL Sunday Ticket Antitrust Trial Kicks Off In LA

    The California federal trial in a multibillion-dollar antitrust suit against the NFL by Sunday Ticket subscribers kicked off Wednesday with the seating of eight jurors and two alternates, after some potential jurors were eliminated for expressing strong views on former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, player concussions and the league's significant wealth.

  • June 05, 2024

    Hunter Biden's Ex-Wife, Ex-Lover Testify About His Drug Use

    Hunter Biden's trial on felony gun charges continued in Delaware federal court on Wednesday with testimony from his ex-wife, a former girlfriend and the salesman at the shop where he bought the Colt Cobra revolver on Oct. 12, 2018.

  • June 05, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Put Trade Secrets Atty Fee Fight Before Jury

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday backed a jury verdict in favor of two former employees that a power trading company claimed took trade secrets to start a new firm, but rejected one defendant's bid to have a jury determine whether he gets attorney fees for what he called "bad-faith" litigation.

  • June 05, 2024

    Meta Can't Dodge Trial In Monopoly Suit, FTC Says

    The Federal Trade Commission said "voluminous evidence" cuts against Meta's bid to avoid trial over claims the social media giant illegally entrenched its monopoly in the market for personal social networking by acquiring WhatsApp and Instagram.

  • June 05, 2024

    Archegos Ex-Exec Who Sued Fund Testifies At Founder's Trial

    An investment pro who claims in a $50 million suit that he was pressured to defer his Archegos pay testified Wednesday in the $36 billion market manipulation case against fund founder Bill Hwang that Hwang called the shots and was rarely questioned.

  • June 05, 2024

    Trump Gag Order Still Needed Through Sentencing, DA Says

    Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg's office has asked a judge not to lift the gag order on Donald Trump before the convicted former president's sentencing next month, arguing in a letter released Wednesday that there is still a need to "protect the integrity" of the hush money case.

  • June 05, 2024

    'Miracle Worker': Menendez's Wife Was Given New Car, Jurors Told

    U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez's wife received a $67,000 Mercedes-Benz convertible thanks to the efforts of two of the congressman's associates, one of whom she called a "miracle worker," jurors heard Wednesday in the government's bribery case in New York federal court.

  • June 05, 2024

    1st Circ. May Undo Tribal Casino Bribery Convictions

    First Circuit judges hinted Wednesday that jurisdictional flaws and other issues could reverse the bribery convictions of an architect and tribal chairman in connection with a proposed $1 billion casino in southeastern Massachusetts.

  • June 05, 2024

    Black Jurors Wrongly Excluded From Fla. Trial, 11th Circ. Told

    A Florida attorney on Wednesday urged an Eleventh Circuit panel to revive his federal complaint against the city of Orlando, saying the wrong statute of limitations standard was used to dismiss a lawsuit alleging his civil rights were violated when opposing lawyers had Black jurors removed from his personal injury trial against the city.

  • June 05, 2024

    4th Circ. Affirms Insurer's Win In Couple's Home Damage Suit

    A West Virginia couple wasn't entitled to a new trial in a property damage coverage dispute, the Fourth Circuit ruled Wednesday, saying a lower court did not abuse its discretion or err in excluding the couple's expert witness and allowing the insurer's expert to testify.

  • June 04, 2024

    Trump Wants Gag Orders Terminated In Wake Of Guilty Verdict

    Donald Trump asked a New York County judge to terminate gag orders restricting the former president from making out-of-court statements during his criminal trial, arguing that the "restrictions" on his First Amendment rights are no longer warranted now that the trial has come to an end.

  • June 04, 2024

    Ontrak CEO Shed $20M In Stock With Insider Info, Jury Hears

    Ontrak Inc.'s founder rushed to dump over $20 million of the healthcare company's stock using insider information about a souring relationship with its biggest client, Cigna, helping him avoid $12 million in losses, prosecutors told California federal jurors Tuesday in a first-of-its-kind securities fraud trial.

  • June 04, 2024

    Monsanto Tries To Flip $1B PCB Losses As Plaintiffs Press On

    Monsanto is moving to capitalize on a Washington state appellate victory it claims casts doubt on more than $1.1 billion in PCB poisoning verdicts, while plaintiffs are staking out positions to defend — and even build on — their blockbuster wins.

  • June 04, 2024

    Monsanto Gets $2.25B Roundup Verdict Slashed To $404M

    A Pennsylvania judge on Tuesday slashed a $2.25 billion verdict awarded to a cancer patient who claimed Monsanto's glyphosate-based weedkiller Roundup contributed to his lymphoma, reducing the jury's 10-figure damages award to $404 million after the Bayer AG subsidiary argued that the initial award was "unconstitutionally excessive."

  • June 04, 2024

    HP Fraud Charges Against Ex-Autonomy Execs Head To Jury

    Closing arguments wrapped Tuesday in a California federal criminal trial over claims that former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch and ex-finance vice president Stephen Chamberlain duped HP into overpaying billions for the British tech company, with Chamberlain's lawyer saying his client did his job "in good faith," which, in the court's eyes, is a "complete defense."

  • June 04, 2024

    DOJ Remains 'Clear Eyed' About No-Poach Prosecutions

    A senior U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division prosecutor continued Tuesday to emphasize the importance of criminal cases accusing employers of fixing wages or curtailing recruitment and hiring of workers from rivals, asserting that despite courtroom defeats, enforcers are trying to learn from past failures.

  • June 04, 2024

    J&J Owes $260M To Ore. Talc Mesothelioma Patient, Jury Says

    An Oregon state jury has ruled that Johnson & Johnson owes $260 million to a woman who said she developed mesothelioma from breathing in asbestos during daily talcum powder use.

  • June 04, 2024

    Hunter Biden Didn't Knowingly Lie On Gun Form, Atty Says

    When Robert Hunter Biden bought a gun in October 2018, he denied on a federal form that he was addicted to drugs — not because he was lying to the government, but because he was lying to himself, his attorney said Tuesday in Delaware federal court.

  • June 04, 2024

    'Miles Guo Stole My Money': NY Jury Hears Of Alleged Fraud

    A former supporter of exiled Chinese billionaire Miles Guo testified in Manhattan federal court Tuesday that the purported billionaire conned her into investing more than $100,000 in the media company he founded alongside former Donald Trump adviser Steve Bannon, describing Guo's interrelated business ventures as a "mafia."

Expert Analysis

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    Compassionate Release Grants Needed Now More Than Ever

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    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission's recent expansion of the criteria for determining compassionate release eligibility, courts should grant such motions more frequently in light of the inherently dangerous conditions presented by increasingly understaffed and overpopulated federal prisons, say Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Perspectives

    Justices' Double Jeopardy Ruling Preserves Acquittal Sanctity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision last week in McElrath v. Georgia, barring the state from retrying a man acquitted of murder after a so-called repugnant verdict, is significant in the tangled web of double jeopardy jurisprudence for its brief and unequivocal protection of an acquittal’s finality, says Lissa Griffin at Pace Law School.

  • High Court Forfeiture Case Again Pits Text Against Purpose

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    In oral arguments Tuesday in McIntosh v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a federal court can impose asset forfeiture on a defendant even if it doesn’t comply with timing rules, which may affect the broader interpretation of procedural deadlines — and tees up the latest battle between textualism and purposivism, say Anden Chow and Christian Bale at MoloLamken.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • More Than Drugs At Stake In High Court's 'Blind Mule' Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's eventual decision in Diaz v. U.S., evaluating whether expert witnesses may testify that most defendants caught with drugs at the border know they are transporting drugs, could have implications for prosecuting everything from complex financial crimes to gun and drug cases, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Why Fla. High Court Adopting Apex Doctrine Is Monumental

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    The Florida Supreme Court recently solidified the apex doctrine in the Sunshine State, an important development that extends the scope of the doctrine in the state to include both corporate and government officials, and formalizes the requirements for a high-level corporate official to challenge a request for a deposition, says Laura Renstrom at Holland & Knight.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

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    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Lessons From Rare Post-Verdict Healthcare Fraud Acquittal

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    A Maryland federal court recently overturned a jury verdict that found a doctor guilty of healthcare fraud related to billing levels for COVID-19 tests, providing defense attorneys with potential strategies for obtaining acquittals in similar prosecutions, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

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