White Collar

  • February 28, 2024

    COVID Fraud Jury Can't Hear Of Gov't's Loan Error, Feds Say

    A jury shouldn't be shown evidence of the U.S. government's error in approving a Michigan business owner's application for a Paycheck Protection Program loan while he was under indictment, federal prosecutors have argued.

  • February 28, 2024

    Ex-NYPD Officer Accused Of Forex Investment Fraud

    A former NYPD officer has been charged with using misrepresentations to induce people to invest in his foreign exchange fund and then paying them back with proceeds from future investors to give the appearance of legitimacy.

  • February 28, 2024

    G20 To Talk Global Minimum Wealth Tax At Brazil's Behest

    The Group of 20 nations' finance ministers and central bank governors will hear proposals for a global minimum tax on wealth Thursday, Brazil's finance minister said Wednesday while expressing support for the policy idea at the opening of meetings in São Paulo.

  • February 28, 2024

    BREAKING: Supreme Court Will Decide Trump's Criminal Immunity Claim

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Wednesday it will review former President Donald Trump's claim that he is immune from federal charges related to interfering in the 2020 presidential election, setting oral arguments in the case for late April. 

  • February 28, 2024

    Halkbank Immunity Gambit Doesn't Appear To Sway 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit did not appear keen Wednesday to dismiss criminal charges accusing Halkbank of laundering over $1 billion of Iran oil proceeds, after the U.S. Supreme Court directed arguments on the Turkish state-owned lender's assertion that common-law sovereign immunity protects it.

  • February 28, 2024

    Tax Preparer Cops To $2.6M Return Fraud After Jury Seated

    A Texas man filed a last-minute guilty plea to arranging around 400 false tax returns just after a jury was seated in his criminal case this week, according to court documents filed in Lone Star State federal court.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Says Ermi Counterclaims In Qui Tam Case Can Stand

    A Georgia federal judge refused on Tuesday to free Ermi LLC's former chief compliance officer from counterclaims the company lodged in response to her whistleblower suit accusing the company of fraud and retaliation, with the judge saying the company has adequately alleged breaches of fiduciary duty and contract claims.

  • February 28, 2024

    Trump's Co-Defendants Barred From Seeing Classified Docs

    The Florida federal judge overseeing former President Donald Trump's criminal case over allegedly mishandling secret documents after leaving office ruled that Trump's two co-defendants can't review roughly 5,100 pages of classified material marked as evidence, saying it's not "relevant and helpful" to their defense.

  • February 28, 2024

    Erika Girardi Can't Shed Costume Merchant's Suit

    A California federal judge has kept alive a costume merchant's malicious prosecution claim against singer and reality TV star Erika Girardi, saying the merchant showed evidence that Girardi had him wrongfully arrested and prosecuted on made-up fraud charges.

  • February 28, 2024

    US Trustee Taps Ex-Prosecutor To Be FTX Examiner

    The U.S. Trustee's Office has urged a Delaware bankruptcy judge to allow Robert Cleary, a former U.S. attorney who is now with Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP, to investigate FTX's finances as an examiner in the defunct cryptocurrency company's Chapter 11 case.

  • February 28, 2024

    Trump Can't Freeze $465M Penalty But Can Seek Loans

    A New York state appellate judge on Wednesday refused to freeze the $465 million civil fraud judgment against Donald Trump while he appeals the award, but said the former president could take out loans to cover the cost of the judgment.  

  • February 28, 2024

    NuVasive Can Pierce Co. To Collect From Ex-Rep, Judge Says

    NuVasive Inc. can pierce the corporate veil to collect a $617,000-plus arbitration judgment it won against a company operated by one of its former sales representatives who improperly cut ties with the medical device company and violated his noncompete agreement, a Boston federal judge has ruled. 

  • February 28, 2024

    DOJ Atty, University Of Chicago Prof Returns To MoloLamken

    National boutique firm MoloLamken said Tuesday that legal scholar and University of Chicago law professor Eric Posner will return to the firm after a stint as counsel in the Justice Department's Antitrust Division.

  • February 28, 2024

    NY Judge In Trump Case Receives Suspicious White Powder

    A suspicious white powder spilled out of an envelope addressed to the judge who ruled against Donald Trump in his New York civil fraud case, prompting emergency personnel to flood the courthouse at 60 Centre St. in Manhattan on Wednesday.

  • February 28, 2024

    Justices Allow Idaho Execution, But State 'Unable To Proceed'

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday cleared the way for Idaho to execute a man for the murder of a fellow inmate, refusing to review his claim that Idaho's continued execution of prisoners whose death sentences were issued by judges and not juries violates the Eighth Amendment.

  • February 27, 2024

    Bankman-Fried Urges No More Than 6.5 Years For FTX Fraud

    FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried asked a Manhattan federal judge late Tuesday for a sentence that releases him "promptly" after his conviction for stealing billions from customers of the now-collapsed crypto exchange, arguing that federal sentencing guidelines recommend no more than six-and-a-half years in prison.

  • February 27, 2024

    Eagles Rocker Testifies His Draft Lyrics Were Stolen, Hawked

    Eagles singer and lyricist Don Henley took the stand this week in the criminal case against three men who allegedly tried to sell what prosecutors say were the rock star's stolen draft lyric sheets, telling a state judge he never wanted anyone to see his creative "detritus."

  • February 27, 2024

    'Rust' Armorer Regretted Not Checking Gun 'More,' Jury Hears

    A New Mexico state jury on Tuesday watched a law enforcement interview in which Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, armorer for the film "Rust," expressed remorse for not having more thoroughly checked a prop gun that went off in actor Alec Baldwin's hand, killing a cinematographer.

  • February 27, 2024

    Fed's Barr Urges Careful Bank Counterparty Risk Practices

    The Federal Reserve's vice chair for supervision said Tuesday that banks should closely manage their exposure to counterparties, including by carefully measuring the credit risks they pose and using conservative margining practices.

  • February 27, 2024

    NJ Real Estate Fund Executive Cops To $658M Ponzi Scheme

    The CEO of a Garden State real estate investment fund pled guilty in New Jersey federal court on Tuesday to defrauding more than 2,000 investors through a $658 million Ponzi scheme, while also evading millions of dollars in tax liabilities, according to federal prosecutors.

  • February 27, 2024

    'I Don't Know' When Ga. DA Romance Began, Witness Says

    The former law partner of Fulton County special prosecutor Nathan Wade, who oversees the election interference case against former President Donald Trump and his Georgia co-defendants, testified Tuesday that he didn't know when Wade's romantic relationship with District Attorney Fani T. Willis began.

  • February 27, 2024

    Supreme Court Doubts Forfeiture Deadline Is Mandatory

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday poked holes in a New York man's claim that courts are barred from issuing forfeiture orders at sentencing in criminal cases unless the prosecution previously submitted a draft request, noting the rule has "a lot of wiggle room," and noncompliance can be easily corrected.

  • February 27, 2024

    NJ Investment Adviser Indicted In $5M Financing Fee Scheme

    A New Jersey investment adviser has been charged with fraudulently collecting millions of dollars in fees from people seeking funding for commercial projects and misappropriating at least $800,000 for his own personal benefit, the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of New Jersey said in an indictment filed on Tuesday.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ch. 11 Trustee Says Bank Fraud-Tied Jewelry CEO Hid Assets

    The trustee for a bankrupt jewelry company allegedly tied to a $2 billion Indian bank fraud has filed a suit in New York bankruptcy court accusing the company's CEO of trying to hide a $7 million Manhattan apartment from creditors.

  • February 27, 2024

    Katten Can't Drop Madoff Ch. 7 Clawback Client, Court Rules

    Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP must keep representing French investment fund Access International Advisors in a $2 billion lawsuit filed by the Chapter 7 trustee for Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities, a New York bankruptcy judge has ruled, explaining that the potential fallout from dropping AIA ahead of discovery in the case overshadows Katten's concerns that it won't be paid.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Compassionate Release Grants Needed Now More Than Ever

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    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission's recent expansion of the criteria for determining compassionate release eligibility, courts should grant such motions more frequently in light of the inherently dangerous conditions presented by increasingly understaffed and overpopulated federal prisons, say Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Communication Is Key As CFPB Updates Appeals Process

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    Though a recently updated Consumer Financial Protection Bureau rule expands financial institutions' abilities to appeal supervisory decisions, creating strong relationships and open communication channels with CFPB examiners may help resolve disputes faster than the more cumbersome formal process, says Jason McElroy at Saul Ewing.

  • Unpacking The New Russia Sanctions And Export Controls

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    Although geographically broad new prohibitions the U.S., U.K. and EU issued last week are somewhat underwhelming in their efforts to target third-country facilitators of Russia sanctions evasion, companies with exposure to noncompliant jurisdictions should pay close attention to their potential impacts, say attorneys at Shearman.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Justices' Double Jeopardy Ruling Preserves Acquittal Sanctity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision last week in McElrath v. Georgia, barring the state from retrying a man acquitted of murder after a so-called repugnant verdict, is significant in the tangled web of double jeopardy jurisprudence for its brief and unequivocal protection of an acquittal’s finality, says Lissa Griffin at Pace Law School.

  • Steps For Companies New To Sanctions Compliance

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    Businesses newly required to implement compliance programs due to the increased breadth of mandatory sanctions and export controls, including 500 additional Russia sanctions announced last Friday, should closely follow the guidance issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control and other regulators, say Jennifer Schubert and Megan Church at MoloLamken.

  • Bank Secrecy Act Lessons For Casinos After DOJ Settlements

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent settlements with the MGM Grand and Cosmopolitan casinos, resolving an investigation into alleged violations of the Bank Secrecy Act, signal a shift in the DOJ's enforcement focus and provide insight into potential pitfalls in anti-money laundering compliance programs, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • High Court Forfeiture Case Again Pits Text Against Purpose

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    In oral arguments Tuesday in McIntosh v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a federal court can impose asset forfeiture on a defendant even if it doesn’t comply with timing rules, which may affect the broader interpretation of procedural deadlines — and tees up the latest battle between textualism and purposivism, say Anden Chow and Christian Bale at MoloLamken.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Cos. Must Know How NY, Federal LLC Disclosure Laws Differ

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    Though New York state's new LLC Transparency Act and the federal Corporate Transparency Act impose similar beneficial owner reporting obligations on limited liability companies, New York LLCs should study the important differences between the laws to ensure they are prepared to comply with both, say Abram Ellis, Olenka Burghardt and Jane Jho at Simpson Thacher.

  • More Than Drugs At Stake In High Court's 'Blind Mule' Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's eventual decision in Diaz v. U.S., evaluating whether expert witnesses may testify that most defendants caught with drugs at the border know they are transporting drugs, could have implications for prosecuting everything from complex financial crimes to gun and drug cases, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

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    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

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